Friday, December 28, 2012

VELCOME by Kevin O'Malley

Lexile     370          Pages     36          Ages 6-9
 AR Quiz No. 36598 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 2.8 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

This is a book of scary stories . . . . sort of.  There is the coffin that follows Freddie home, the Viper, mysterious rapping, and some VERY SCARY PICTURES (wink-wink.)   They build up to a highly suspenseful point and then you turn the page and each one has a "punny" (sorry!) ending. : )

Reading Velcome aloud is the best fun!  The narrator is a Peter Lorre-esque character sitting in his reading chair wearing a very suave robe complete with ascot, and a book open on his lap.  Reading the scary part of each story in a Vincent Price style, throwing in a Transylvanian accent will help build the suspense as well as upping the fun factor.  Children who are starting to get the idea of jokes, especially puns, will laugh right out loud but the younger crowd may not always make the connections.

While I'm always up for a good pun, the funniest part of the book for me was the narrator's dog who keeps popping up on a page, holding up a sign berating the intelligence of the story and warning readers that for their own good they should "just stop reading . . . . now!" His expressions are great, showing just how exasperated he is.  In the end he is storming out the front door with a sign declaring, "I'm outta this nut hut!" : )

As a really fun read, Kevin O'Malley's Velcome is right at the top of the list.

Happy Reading!
Miss Laurie

Velcome can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/c9snvhb
and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.

Friday, December 21, 2012

AS THE YEAR CLOSES

Merry Christmas and best wishes for the New Year from
Miss Laurie 
and the entire staff of
The Lake County Public Library


These and other holiday offerings are available at www.lcplin.org
and at any branch of
The Lake County Public Library

Monday, December 10, 2012

DO YOU STILL LOVE ME? by Charlotte Middleton

Lexile     Not Rated          Pages     32          Ages     4 - 6
 AR Quiz No. 70832 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 2.3 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

Dudley is a happy dog. He gets up early, plays hide and seek, and chases the neighbor's cat, Jenna. Best of all, he snuggles with his best friend, Anna.  One day Anna brings home a new friend - a chameleon named Pequito. Pequito seems to be better at everything - he gets up earlier, and he's REALLY good at hiding.   What's worse, he has taken Dudley's snuggle place on Anna's lap.  Dudley is forlorn, thinking Anna doesn't love him anymore and he goes to his bed to take a nap.  When he wakes up, Pequito is gone and Dudley is glad.  But Pequito is gone for a long time and Dudley starts to worry. He goes to see if he can find him and . . . . OH NO!  Jenna has already found Pequito and is about to make him her afternoon snack!  Dudley barks his loudest bark and saves Pequito. From then on, Dudley is Pequito's and Anna's hero as he takes on the job of being the little chameleon's protector, something he is really good at!

Dudley's feelings of being replaced will be familiar to any child who has a younger sibling or has had a new child move into the neighborhood and take up with "their" friend.  Happily, the story will also help them understand that parents and friendships don't have to be exclusive and that everyone in the group adds their own brand of special to the mix.

Happy Reading!
Miss Laurie

Do You Still Love Me? can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/bp6pgag  and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.



Sunday, December 2, 2012

WEIRD! by Erin Frankel, illustrated by Paula Heaphy

Lexile     540          Pages     48          Ages     5 - 9

Luisa is being bullied at school by Sam, a girl in her class.  No matter what Luisa does, or says, or wears, Sam tells her she's weird.  At first, Luisa believes her and each time Sam tells her she's weird she stops doing whatever it is that Sam is making fun of.  Pretty soon Luisa doesn't feel like herself at all but doesn't know what to do about it.  Finally, she talks to her mother who tells her that she is perfect just the way she is. Luisa thinks about it and decides she is going to ignore Sam and see what happens.  To her surprise, all of her friends are happy to have the old Luisa back - they saw what was happening but didn't know any more than Luisa what to do about it.  Luisa discovers that the more she ignores Sam, the less Sam picks on her.

Weird! is the first book of a trilogy about bullying, a problem that seems to be growing in our schools today.  Children who have been subjected to a bully will quickly identify with Luisa, recognizing her hurt and confusion.  Luisa's story should help them see there is a solution and that the issue is not theirs in the first place - that the bully is the one with the problem.  The story should also help other children understand just how devastating bullying can be, and that they should be friendly with everyone and treat them with respect. 

Weird! should be a must-read for elementary grades and if it is an indication of how good the trilogy is, Dare! (number two), and Tough! (number three) should be added to your shelf as well.

Happy Reading!
Miss Laurie

Weird! can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/al34zps   and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.

Dare! explores bullying from the bystander's point of view. It is on order and can be placed on hold by clicking here: http://tinyurl.com/b4oh82b

Tough! is the viewpoint of the bully. You can place your hold here:  http://tinyurl.com/be74z7g






Saturday, November 24, 2012

BEING FRANK by Donna W. Earnhardt, illustrated by Andrea Castellani

Lexile     Not Rated          Pages     32          Ages     5 and older
 AR Quiz No. 154904 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 3.3 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

Young Frank is, well . . . . frank.  He believes honesty is the best policy - in ALL things.  In his honesty, Frank is alienating everyone - his friends, the principal, and even his mother!  When people start avoiding him he is unhappy.  Hoping to feel better he goes up the street to visit with his Grandpa Ernest.  He tells Grandpa how everyone is upset with him and that he isn't so sure that honesty is, in fact, the best policy.  Grandpa tells him that when he was younger he had felt that way too. Then by example he teaches Frank the fine art of tact. When Mrs. Peacock walks by in a massive, flowered hat and asks Grandpa how he likes it he tells her, "There are an awful lot of flowers up there.  But my favorite is the purple one in the middle."  Frank thinks his grandpa has lied but Grandpa tells him that no, he didn't lie.  He really does like the purple one best. He goes on to explain how to talk about the good things instead of the not-so-good.  The next day Frank tries out Grandpa's approach and finds out that it works!  Everyone is happy again and Frank has learned a valuable lesson.

How often have you experienced the precocious and sometimes embarrassing "out of the mouths of babes" moments?  This is a book that is loads of fun for both children and adults, while teaching the meaning and necessity of tact.  Kids will giggle when Frank tells his teacher her breath smells funny and the principal that his toupee looks like a weasel!  I laughed right out loud when Frank told the police officer that had stopped his mom, "Yes, officer.  She knew how fast she was going.  I told her."  Andrea Castellani's illustrations are brilliant and add to the fun.

I enjoyed Being Frank and think it would be a great addition to any reading list.

Happy Reading!
Miss Laurie

Being Frank can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/a8ex9h3  and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.


Wednesday, November 14, 2012

DOG IN BOOTS by Greg Gormley, illustrated by Roberta Angaramo

Lexile     AD680          Pages     32          Ages 3 - 6
 AR Quiz No. 143289 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 3.4 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

After reading Puss in Boots, Dog decides he needs a pair of fancy boots too so he goes to the shoe store and buys himself some. However, when he gets home and tries to dig up his bone he discovers that boots aren't so good for digging.  He takes them back and exchanges them for rain boots, but those are no good for swimming.  Back he goes to the store and this time he comes home with flippers, which are great for swimming but are of absolutely no use for scratching.  Finally after several exchanges, Dog asks the clerk for something that is good for ALL the things he likes to do.  The clerk replies, "I don't have anything like that, but you do - they're called PAWS!"  Dog is so happy he runs home and does all his favorite things - digging, running, swimming, scratching.  Blissfully worn out, he goes inside to rest and read another book, this one about a girl with a beautiful red cape.  "Hmmmmm . . . ." dog thinks . . . .

Children will love all of the funny shoes Dog wears while learning that sometimes, even though something looks better, what you already have is the best.

With words like splendid, magnificent, awful, and perfect, Dog in Boots will help your child expand their use of descriptive words, and the story lends itself to expansion, letting children use their imaginations to come up with other types of shoes Dog could try and why they would or wouldn't be good choices.

I enjoyed Dog in Boots and think you and your little ones will too!

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

Dog in Boots can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/9hwzc3q  and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.




Thursday, November 1, 2012

JUNGLE HALLOWEEN by Maryann Cocca-Leffler

Lexile     Not Rated          Pages     32          Ages 3 - 5
 AR Quiz No. 64296 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 2.3 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

This book is just plain fun.  In bright, enjoyable, two-page spreads, Cocca-Leffler shows the jungle animals engaged in the fun of preparing for Halloween.

"Jungle painting, Jungle sewing, Jungle carving, Jungle blowing."

Kids will get a good laugh at the costumes - a rhino in a hula skirt, a fairy giraffe, a cowboy crocodile, an elephant in a jester's hat, and more.

If you're looking for a story time hit, Jungle Halloween will do the trick!

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

Jungle Halloween can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here  http://tinyurl.com/8apsm6z  and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.



Friday, October 26, 2012

VAMPIRINA BALLERINA by Anne Marie Pace, illustrated by LeUyen Pham

Lexile     Not Rated          Pages     40          Ages     3 - 7
 AR Quiz No. 153451 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 3.1 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

Vampirina is a little girl vampire who wants to be a ballerina.  She has obstacles to overcome - first, being a vampire, she needs a class that meets at night!  Also, she is nervous about meeting new people, and there is the challenge of her classmates being afraid of her because she is different.  Ballet is hard work but in the end, through practice and perseverance, Vampirina performs beautifully at her recital and is proud that she accomplished her goal.

I like so many things about this book that it's difficult to know where to begin!  First, I guess, is that although she is a vampire, Vampirina is just adorable with her big eyes and glittery hair bow and cape. She knows what she wants and doesn't let anything stand in her way. Even when difficult Vampirina perseveres, knowing that "it doesn't matter if you take one giant leap or many tiny steps, as long as you are moving toward your goal."  There is other good advice, including "Once class begins, keep your eyes and ears open and your mouth closed," and "A mistake here or there is not a reflection on your talent."  I also liked that the story stressed respect for both the other students and the teacher, and it shows Vampirina's support group in Mommy and Daddy vampire, the Frankenstein chauffeur, and even the family pets!

Full of good, practical advice accompanied by charmingly fun illustrations, Vampirina Ballerina is a great addition to any book shelf.

Happy Reading!
Miss Laurie

Vampirina Ballerina can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here  http://tinyurl.com/98z88v3  and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.


Friday, October 19, 2012

THIS LITTLE PIGGY'S BOOK OF MANNERS by Kathryn Madeline Allen, illustrated by Nancy Wolff

Lexile     Not Rated          Pages     32          Ages 3 - 7
 AR Quiz No. 74246 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 1.6 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

*****************************************************************************************


"This Little Piggy said 'Please,' and 'Thank you,'   
This Little Piggy did not.
This Little Piggy closed his mouth while he ate . . ."
"This Little Piggy forgot."

This book is a great introduction to manners, covering most of the good manners we try to instill in our children. I like that it shows both the good and bad manners, giving a chance to compare the consequences of each.

The illustrations are bright and imaginative, making This Little Piggy's Book of Manners a fun way to learn the mannerly way to behave.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

This Little Piggy's Book of Manners can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/9kszmd7 and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.









Monday, October 15, 2012

MISS MINGO and the FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL by Jamie Harper

Lexile     AD660          Pages     32          Ages     4 - 8
 AR Quiz No. 108712 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 3.6 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

You know that elephant in the room that no one wants to talk about?  Well, in Miss Mingo (the flamingo)'s class he's joined by a hippo, an alligator, a giraffe and many other fascinating creatures!

On the first day of school, to break the ice Miss Mingo has everyone in the class share something special about themselves.  She starts things off by telling how what she eats is what makes her pink and that she always eats . . . . . upside down! 

So begins the tale of 3,000 teeth (alligator,) an 18 inch tongue (giraffe,) and other fun animal facts.  At the end of the day everyone has made friends with one another and Miss Mingo is excited about the wonderful year she will have with her fabulous class.

In Miss Mingo and the First Day of School, Jamie Harper weaves the perfect mixture of fact and fiction into a fabulous and fun story filled with delightful, humorous illustrations that will show children how being unique is a good thing and that diversity makes life interesting.  Miss Mingo can be applied not only to the first day of school, but to any happening that is scary and new and help your child be less stressed about it.  

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

Miss Mingo and the First Day of School can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/9qeym9k  and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.


Friday, September 28, 2012

SOMETHING SPECIAL by Nicola Moon, illustrated by Alex Ayliffe

Lexile     Not Rated          Pages     32          Ages     2 - 6
AR Quiz No. 21397 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 3.1 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

In Miss Brown's class, Friday is Special Day. Each child brings in something that is special to them.  Charlie is trying to find something to take and is frustrated because his mother is too busy caring for his new baby sister, Sally, to help him.  He misses one Friday and as the next one approaches, he still hasn't decided what to take.

Always busy, his mother is trying to bake cookies while Sally is napping, so she's no help. To top it off, Sally starts fussing in her crib and Mom tells Charlie to go play with the baby so she can get the cookies out of the oven!  Already unhappy with Sally, Charlie grumbles all the way to the bedroom.  When he gets there he grabs one of Sally's little toys and half-heartedly gives it a shake.  Sally stops crying!! As Charlie reaches out to touch Sally's tiny hand, she grabs onto his finger. Charlie thinks, "That feels kind of nice!"  Just then, Sally gives Charlie a BIG smile and right then and there Charlie knows what he will take to school on Special Day.

Something Special is great to read to new brothers and sisters who are feeling like they have been replaced and are no longer important to Mom and Dad. It opens the door for discussion about the care a new baby needs, how that makes the older child feel, and that Mom and Dad have enough love for all of their children.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

Something Special can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/99y5bjf and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.



Monday, September 17, 2012

T-REX AND THE MOTHER'S DAY HUG by Lois G. Grambling, illustrated by Jack E. Davis

Lexile     AD480          Pages     28          Ages     5 - 7
 AR Quiz No. 121645 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 2.4 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

Mother's Day is coming and all of T-Rex's friends have bought a gift for their mother but T-Rex wants to do something special for his momma, not buy something for her.  When Mother's Day arrives, T-Rex tells Momma, "Happy Mother's Day!  I want to DO something for you - what would you like me to do?"

Momma tells him that she would really like a BIG Mother's Day hug, and that's what would make her happy.  But T-Rex doesn't think a hug is big enough to show Momma how much he loves her and decides to fancy up her car for her . . . . BIG disaster!

Momma hides her dismay and when T-Rex gives her a big hug and tells her he loves her she tells him she loves him too and that his hug has made her very happy.

T-Rex and the Mother's Day Hug has big, colorful, and funny illustrations that will have your little one laughing in delight.  The story is amusing and also shows children that often it's the little things you do that mean the most.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

T-Rex and the Mother's Day Hug can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/8spwq6c  and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.


Tuesday, September 4, 2012

SOPHIE'S TROPHY by Susan Middleton Elya, illustrated by Viviana Garofoli

Lexile     Not Rated          Pages     32          Ages     4 - 8
 AR Quiz No. 108096 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 2.8 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP


Sophie Toad's big brother Vince (the Prince) is the best looking toad in the bog. He models and has many trophies for his good looks while Sophie, who is not nearly as good looking, has none. She sits on her log, singing the blues, and then goes to bed and dreams she is a model. In her dream, Sophie is the most wanted model in the world and she works and works and works until she is just too tired to even smile. She wakens and realizes that she doesn't want to be a model after all.

In the meantime the singing group, The Toadettes, have heard Sophie's beautiful voice and ask her to join the group and she agrees. Finally, it's time for The Toadettes to perform in a contest at the fair, but all of them except Sophie have eaten bad flies and are ill and can't perform. So Sophie performs solo and wins the first prize trophy! Her brother is very proud of Sophie and makes a special space on his mantel for her trophy. Sophie has finally found her niche!

Sophie's Trophy is written in both English and Spanish, with the languages blended into a seamless, rhythmic story. Told in rhyme, it helps teach children that not everyone is good at everything, but everyone is good at something, and also that "the grass is always greener" - sometimes what they wish for is harder than it looks and isn't really the thing for them at all!  The Spanish words sprinkled through the story introduces a new language, with some of the words being everyday - hermano (brother) - and some not used so often - pestanas (eyelashes.) There is a glossary in the front of the book with  meanings and pronunciation to help with the Spanish words.

The big, bold, colorful illustrations are relatively simple yet fun. Sophie's Trophy would be a valuable addition to your child's reading list.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

Sophie's Trophy can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/9mxntzk
and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.



Monday, August 27, 2012

THE REVENGE OF THE MAGIC CHICKEN by Helen Lester, illustrated by Lynn Munsinger

Lexile      Not Rated           Pages     30           Ages     5-8

Wizard, Fairy and Magic Chicken are always arguing. One day Wizard and Fairy get so angry that Fairy turns Wizard into a cow and he turns Fairy into a blueberry muffin. Magic Chicken thinks it's the funniest thing he's ever seen and laughs and laughs and laughs. Now even more angry, Wizard and Fairy turn Magic Chicken into a ballerina.

Magic Chicken plans his revenge carefully, but in carrying it out he is having so much fun he overdoes it and his revenge nearly backfires and his friends could have been hurt. All turns out well in the end and the friends are back to their old selves, ready for a new adventure.


This book is just plain fun. The illustrations are colorful and amusing and the story teaches children that revenge can have undesirable consequences.

For a good laugh and a positive and enjoyable lesson, pick up a copy of The Revenge of the Magic Chicken today!

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

The Revenge of the Magic Chicken can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/974a8le  and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.



Thursday, August 16, 2012

JINKA JINKA JELLY BEAN by Molly Dingles, illustrated by Aimee Bingler


Lexile     Not Rated               Pages     34               Ages 4 - 8
 AR Quiz No. 49489 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 2.4 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

This book is beautifully illustrated.  The pictures are friendly and non-threatening, done in lovely colors that catch the reader's eye. However, it looks so friendly that children may pick it up randomly and end up with questions that parents aren't yet ready to answer.

If adults are, in fact, using the book to introduce death to a young child, it may make the children easier in their minds about where their loved one has gone, but does nothing to help them deal with their personal feelings of loss and sadness.

I personally feel that Jinka Jinka Jelly Bean may make the afterlife too appealing, making children want to go there without understanding that once there, they can never return.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

Jinka Jinka Jelly Bean can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/8jhjxrf  and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.



Monday, August 13, 2012

ENRICO STARTS SCHOOL by Charlotte Middleton


Lexile     Not Rated               Pages     32               Ages     4 - 6
 AR Quiz No. 80669 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 3.4 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

Enrico the cat is five years old.  He has mastered riding a two-wheeler, he makes an awesome sardine and lobster-jelly sandwich, and he is an excellent wind-up mouse catcher.  Despite his confidence in his abilities, Enrico now faces a new challenge that has him a little afraid - it is time for him to start school.  He is unsure how to approach making new friends and he is too shy to participate in class, afraid of giving a wrong answer and looking silly.  When his first few attempts to make friends fail, Enrico's little brother, Chico, suggests that he just be himself.  What a novel idea! 

Enrico starts participating in class and instead of approaching the other children and trying to fit in, he starts playing by himself and lets the others come to him. In the end he has made a new best friend, Pepe, who has interests similar to his own.

The first day of school is such a scary time for many children.  Enrico Starts School gives you a way to discuss with them some of the issues they may encounter and possible ways of dealing with them.  I personally think the lesson of "To thine own self be true" is one of the most valuable lessons we can teach our children - to not do something they are uncomfortable with in order to be accepted.

With its simple, boldly colored illustrations, Enrico Starts School will help your child transition from preschooler to kindergartner in a happy, giggly way.

Happy Reading!
Miss Laurie

Enrico Starts School can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/96483wb and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.




Saturday, August 11, 2012

LEARN TO CELEBRATE BOOKS!

BEATRICE DOESN'T WANT TO
by Laura Numeroff, illustrated by Lynn Munsinger

Lexile     Not Rated

Pages     32

Ages      3 - 6

LOLA AT THE LIBRARY
by Anna McQuinn, illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw

Lexile     AD580

Pages     22

Ages      3 - 5 


PENELOPE POPPER, BOOK DOCTOR
 by Toni Buzzeo, illustrated by Jana Christy

 Lexile     Not Rated

 Pages     32

 Ages      4 - 7



Today we have books that are great for introducing your children to reading, book care and your local library.  Often, we teach our children to read but leave out the things that go with it!

In Beatrice Doesn't Want To, little Beatrice is forced to go to the library with her older brother, who has a report to do for school.  "I don't want to," she says, "I don't like books!"  But she has to go so brother Henry tries to find something for her to do so he can get his work done.  Finally, he happens upon a poster for story hour and makes her go.  At first, she sits with her arms crossed and a frown on her face.  But eventually, the story the librarian tells about a roller skating mouse catches her attention.  Beatrice discovers that she does like books; she just hadn't yet found the right one.

Lola loves Tuesdays; that is the day she and her mommy visit the library!  She loves everything about the day, from making sure she packs all of her library books she has borrowed into her backpack along with her library card, to story hour, the special treat she and mommy get on the way home, and the story Mommy reads to her at bedtime.  Lola thinks that every day should end with a good book!  Lola at the Library is a wonderful book for teaching your preschooler about all of the wonderful things about going to the library.

Penelope Popper wants to be a doctor.  She is always after one of her friends to let her listen to their heart or take their blood pressure and other doctor things.  Her friends don't always cooperate and Penelope is sad until Ms. Brisco, the school librarian, tells her there are all kinds of doctors - people doctors, animal doctors and . . . . book doctors!  She teaches Penelope how to care for and repair the books in the library. Penelope, in turn, passes along the correct way to care for books along to the other children in her class. Penelope Popper, Book Doctor teaches your child about the proper care and handling of books; to make sure your hands are clean so you don't get anything on the book, to turn pages carefully from the top right corner, and the ultimate sin - never dog-ear the pages!  It also shows children that they can follow their dreams, even if those dreams change a little over time.

Any one of these books would make a wonderful addition to your collection. Or, find them at your local library! : )

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

Beatrice Doesn't Want To, Lola at the Library, and Penelope Popper, Book Doctor can all be found at the Lake County Public Library or, click here www.lcplin.org and with your library card number and PIN, place a hold for pick-up at your favorite branch.








Monday, August 6, 2012

THE PERFECTLY HORRIBLE HALLOWEEN by Nancy Poydar

Lexile     180          Pages     32          Ages     4-8
AR Quiz No. 53946 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 2.7 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

Arnold is devastated when he realizes he has left his pirate costume for the class Halloween party on the bus.  He had counted on it to win the prize for the scariest costume.  He tries fashioning a bug costume from a coat and an extra sweater in his class cubby (for extra arms) and pencils for antenna but when that doesn't work, Arnold decides he isn't going to the party at all and crawls under a tarp in the classroom that they use for painting projects to hide.  Will Arnold miss the party? Does someone else win the scariest costume prize? Read The Perfectly Horrible Halloween and find the answers to these burning questions. : )

I think Arnold's imagination is great!  Even though the bug costume didn't work at least he tried.  And in the end things worked out fine for Arnold, showing children that sometimes things aren't nearly as bad as they seem.  Arnold leaving his costume on the bus also opens a door for a discussion about both responsibility and consequences. Even if you just read The Perfectly Horrible Halloween for fun, you won't be disappointed.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

The Perfectly Horrible Halloween can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here  http://tinyurl.com/cd54vpn and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.









Monday, July 30, 2012

THE COPY CROCS by David Bedford, illustrated by Emily Bolam


Lexile     Not Rated          Pages     32          Ages     4 - 8
AR Quiz No. 86530 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 3.0 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

Crocodile has lived in the same pond his whole life.  But now his pond has become so crowded.  Every time he moves either he bumps into someone or someone bumps into him.  So he decides to find a new place to live.  Crocodile moves first to a mud hole, then a river, then a mountain top. But everyone keeps following and copying what he is doing.  "Why do you keep copying me?" Crocodile shouts.  "Because you always think of the fun things to do," one of his friends replies.

In the middle of the night he sneaks away and goes back to his pond, where it's nice and quiet.  And big.  And lonely.  Crocodile finds that he doesn't like being alone ALL the time.  Suddenly, "SURPRISE!"  All of his crocodile friends come jumping into the pond, laughing and playing.  Crocodile discovers that while he likes to be alone some of the time, he also doesn't mind sharing his pond with others too.

"MOM! Joey's copying me and he won't stop!!"  How often do you hear this complaint?

Crocodile's story lets children know that when someone copies what they are doing it's because they think it's cool. You can also let them know that imitation is the highest form of flattery, and that all things, when all is said and done, are copied. Someone rode the first horse, built the first house, made the first telephone, and the first video game.

Copy Crocs also shows children the value of friendship but also lets them know that everyone needs some alone time now and then.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

Copy Crocs can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/d9aufkg and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.


Friday, July 27, 2012

JUMPY JACK & GOOGILY by Meg Rosoff & Sophie Blackall


Lexile     Not Rated               Pages     32               Ages     3-8

Jumpy Jack is afraid of monsters.  VERY afraid.  He goes through his day always worrying what will be around the corner.  Lucky for him he has his friend Googily who helps him out, looking for the monsters behind the tree, in the shed, and under the bed.  The thing is, Googily IS a monster!  He is also as it turns out, a very kind friend. He looks for all of Jack's monsters, assuring him that there is nothing to fear.  Finally, at the end of the day, relieved of all his fears Jack settles down to go to sleep and Googily asks him, "Will you check under my bed? I think I heard a sock and I am VERY afraid of socks!"

Jumpy Jack & Googily helps make monsters a not so scary thing.  As Jumpy Jack describes what he perceives to be a monster, the young reader will soon realize that Jack is describing his friend to a "T" without ever realizing that Googily is, in fact, a monster.  At the end, Googily's fear of a sock is a funny way to help children realize that most fears are not scary at all, it just depends on how you look at things.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

  Jumpy Jack & Googily can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here  http://tinyurl.com/cceqf8a and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.


Monday, July 23, 2012

STICK by Steve Breen


Lexile    Beginning Reader               Pages    44                 Ages    4 - 8


Stick is a very independent little froggy, always telling Mama Frog that he can do things "all by himself."  One day, aiming for a tasty mosquito lunch, Stick misses and latches on to a big, strong dragonfly instead.  With his sticky tongue, Stick can't let go and WHOOSH!  Stick is yanked off his lily pad and into the sky.  He sails along - through the swamp, a back yard, a living room, and into the city where animals and people alike are astounded to see a flying frog.  He is finally able to let go but his journey isn't yet done.  Stick is far, far from home and feels very alone.  He realizes that it is time to ask for help so he asks a heron, who flies Stick back to his lily pad and Mama Frog, who is thrilled to have him back.

Little Stick is full of confidence and independence - which is a good thing!  But children need to know that there comes a point in every one's life that they need to ask for help, and that it's not only okay to ask, but smart.  The colorful and humorous illustrations get this across in a fun way.  Steve Breen's Stick, a 2009 Young Hoosier Award nominee, would be a great addition to your collection.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

Stick can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/c5j4hlj and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.



Tuesday, July 17, 2012

DADDY, COULD I HAVE AN ELEPHANT? by Jake Wolf, illustrated by Marylin Hafner

Lexile   Not Rated
Pages   32
Ages    3-8

I suspect that Tony, the main character of Daddy, Could I Have an Elephant?, had a plan. Plans are good - especially when they work!

One morning Tony's father awakens to Tony, up close and personal. Tony, nearly nose to nose with him says, "Daddy, I need a pet."

"You do?" says, Daddy, "What kind?"

Tony starts out with, "Could I have an elephant?"  Daddy gives him several reasons as to why an elephant would not be a good choice for their small apartment.  So Tony makes another suggestion - "How about a pony?" and receives the same response.  So Tony moves on - a 20 foot python, a flock of sheep, a dolphin, or a flamingo.  For every animal Tony asks for, Daddy comes up with a good reason not to have that particular pet.  Finally Tony says, "Maybe we should get something small," to which his father responds that something small was just what he was thinking.

Tony says, "Puppies are small," and Daddy agrees. In the end Tony and his dad are headed off to the pet store to start the search for puppy.

This is a great book to introduce the responsibility of pet ownership to your children. In a fun and silly manner it shows them that different animals need different things and as the owner, you are responsible for providing their needs and that sometimes an animal's requirements just aren't practical in a home designed for humans. Also, reasonable discussion and making compromises are good lessons that can be discussed.

Marylin Hafners illustrations are colorful and humorous and will quickly make Daddy, Could I Have an Elephant? a favorite read.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

Daddy, Could I Have an Elephant? can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/86cnw88 and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.






Monday, July 16, 2012

THE GRANNYMAN by Judith Schachner

Lexile:     AD610
Pages:     32
Ages:      4 - 8
AR Quiz No. 34576 EN Fiction
  IL: LG - BL: 4.1 - AR Pts: 0.5
  AR Quiz Types: RP

I am a cat lover. A really BIG cat lover! Given the time and money, I could be the "Crazy Cat Lady!" : ) But, even if I wasn't cat-crazy, The Grannyman would still fall into my Top Five Favorite Children's Books of All Time!

Simon is an old Siamese cat. An OLD cat! He has lived with his loving family for a long time, and they have pampered and loved him and he has loved them right back. But Simon is tired. Things just don't work like they used to. He goes through his memories, one by one - he remembers being a kitten, the runt of the litter with the runny nose and crooked tail, that no one wanted. He remembers how happy he was when a nice couple thought he was just perfect and took him into their loving home, loving him even through all the trials and tribulations of cathood - clawing the furniture, climbing the drapes, and eating the houseplants. He has had the perfect nine lives. But now he is old, mostly blind, toothless; he sees no reason to go on, until . . . .

What's that smell? Hey, it's a kitten! WELL! Simon decides that maybe he isn't quite done yet. I mean, if he gives up now who will teach this kitten to be a proper CAT?  Simon teaches the kitten about life - from the milk saucer to the litterbox. His loving care of the kitten earns him a new name: The Grannyman.

You can teach your children so much from this book! It starts with the lesson that you don't have to be perfect - even if your tail is crooked there is someone out there that will love you. Then there's the lesson that everyone needs a purpose in life, to feel needed and useful. And last but not least - that old age should be respected and revered - your elders have much they can teach you.

Anyone who has ever owned and loved a cat will surely be delighted with The Grannyman.

Happy Reading,
Miss Laurie

The Grannyman can be checked out at any Lake County Public Library, or click here http://tinyurl.com/6lt9noh and with your library card number and PIN you can place a hold for easy pickup at your favorite branch.